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By: Amber Mosher, intern and MPH-RD candidate at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


As we age, many of us may be exploring ways that we can live well and live longer. The good news is that being healthy and happy can be as easy as saying you're A-B-Cs! Start today with these easy tips.

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By: Elizabeth Rahavi, RD Date: 9/28/11

If health is a priority, then eating can often be like playing a game of Scrabble: striving to get the most out of each turn—always searching for that seven letter word. V-E-G-G-I-E-S: a seven letter word that can lead to good health. Add fruit to your veggies to make a colorful plate and get a triple word score.

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By: Kris Sollid, RD Date: 9/27/11

Numbers can be a polarizing topic. Some people love ‘em, some people hate ‘em, but we all have to deal with them at some point. Such is the case with sodium consumption, or is it? In light of the increased media attention due to the numerous studies and official reports that have recently been released regarding sodium, most notably the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2011 is the perfect point in time to check in with consumers. Here is a sneak peak of the latest findings from our 2011 IFIC Consumer Sodium Research.
 

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By: Kimberly Reed, Executive Director, IFIC Foundation Date: 9/23/11

As I have noted in prior blog posts, earlier this week, Heads of State from around the world met at the United Nations for the High-level Meeting on Noncommunicable Disease (NCD) Prevention and Control and unanimously adopted a Political Declaration to stand united in a global fight against NCDs, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and chronic respiratory disease. Full details on the U.N. events can be found here.

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By: Eric Mittenthal Date: 9/23/11

One of the highlights of our year is upon us once again as several of our staff at the International Food Information Council Foundation head to San Diego for the American Dietetic Association Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo. We’ll be especially busy this year, participating in four sessions during the conference. So where can you find us? Here’s a guide:

 

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By: Tony Flood Date: 9/22/11

A recent report, BPA in Kids’ Canned Food, from the Breast Cancer Fund has once again unduly thrust Bisphenol A back under the media spotlight. This fear-inducing report attempts to draw a parallel between the levels of BPA found in popular children’s meals and health effects from research involving laboratory animals. Currently the research that exists on health effects from BPA is based on animal studies or epidemiologic evidence that cannot conclude a causal relationship between BPA and human health risk.

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By: Susan Piergeorge, MS, RD, Author Date: 9/21/11

Its official—the Baby Boomers have hit middle age. Born 1946 to 1964 we have moved in to the middle part of our lives. And, being that we are known as the rebellious generation, we are likely to rebel against aging as well. Here are a few sensible and solid nutrition tips for Baby Boomers to help them age with gusto.

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On Behalf of the Cook It Safe Taskforce Date: 9/19/11

Every day millions of Americans rely on a variety of pre-prepared convenience foods to satisfy their desire for a quick, affordable and healthy meal.   Popping a frozen or refrigerated entrée into the microwave has become a familiar part of the American dining ritual. 

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By: Tony Flood Date: 9/16/11

This month U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack unveiled the first themed message “Make Half Your Plate Fruits and Vegetables” to promote the 2010 Dietary Guidelines and MyPlate icon. But I have an additional important piece to add – and that’s food safety. During this crucial time of a listeria outbreak from cantaloupes, it’s extremely important that all foods including fruits and vegetables are properly handled to reduce the risk of any potential contamination.

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By: Tony Flood Date: 9/15/11

The following is an update to an earlier blog posted on August 4, 2011 in response to a recall of ground turkey. Today, we are revisiting the topic of food recalls to provide practical information to keep you and your family safe and to reduce the risk of foodborne illness.

Over the past few days, there continues to be escalating media attention regarding a recall of ground turkey. Earlier this week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture announced that approximately “185,000 pounds of ground turkey products that may be contaminated with a strain of Salmonella Heidelberg” had been recalled. The strain of Salmonella Heidelberg is similar to that of an earlier outbreak of Salmonellosis from an earlier recall of ground turkey on August 3, 2011.

 

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By: Tony Flood Date: 9/14/11

Today's story involves a well-known media personality using food as a tool to instill fear in the lives of many mothers working tirelessly to provide their families with safe, nutritious and healthy meals. In this case, he is using apple juice – a well-liked and trusted drink that I grew up with as a child.

The information being presented by this well-known and recognized physician is about trace levels of naturally occurring arsenic found in apple juice. Don’t be deterred – this is nothing extraordinary and certainly not new information. For a number of years, the FDA has been aware about trace levels of arsenic in apple juice and other fruit juice products.

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By: Kimberly Reed, Executive Director, IFIC Foundation Date: 09/13/11

Next week in New York City, Heads of State and Government from around the world will be gathering at the United Nations for a historic High-level Meeting on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs).

As outlined in my blog post from July 27 – What Are NCDs and How Can We Respond? – NCDs, which include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancers, and chronic respiratory diseases and, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), cause 60% of all deaths globally, with more than 80% occurring in developing countries. WHO attributes NCDs to poor diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use, and harmful use of alcohol. For additional background, there is an excellent YouTube video – WHO: Unite in the Fight Against NCDs – that will give you greater context of the issue and the United Nations meeting.

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On Behalf of the Cook It Safe Taskforce Date: 9/6/11

Busy parents appreciate how hectic the after-five routine can be, especially when hungry mouths are staring at you and wondering when dinner will be served. Many Americans’ freezers are stocked with trusted meals sure to put a smile on any kid’s face. While the shortest distance between the freezer and the table may be the microwave oven, not all frozen foods can be cooked in the microwave. The package instructions specify which type of appliance will cook your family’s favorite frozen meal safely and deliciously.
 

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By: Dayle Hayes, MS, RD Date: 9/9/11
I originally wrote this column on September 18, 2001. As we focus on the 10th anniversary of this national tragedy, I believe that the benefits of eating together with family and friends are just an important. A recent issue of the Dairy Council of California Health Connections newsletter explored this issue in depth: Raising Healthy Eaters, Benefits and Challenges of Gathering Around the Table (Summer 2011). 

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By: Cheryl Molinatto Date: 9/8/11

I recently returned from a vacation to the blinking lights of every clock in the house. After a long sigh, I began the process of bringing the house back to life. And then as I opened the refrigerator I thought, “Oh no, should I throw all this food out?” If you’re like me, you think carefully about your food budget. I clip coupons and buy items on sale or in bulk. Of course before our vacation, we drank all the milk and moved some food to the freezer. There were no open yogurt containers nor eggs or meat in our fridge. But what about the opened ranch dressing? The butter? Mayonnaise? And how do I know if my freezer full of food is OK and safe to eat?
 

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On Behalf of the Cook It Safe Taskforce    Date: 9/6/11

There is a particular microwaveable food product that I’ve been eating since I was in high school—it’s a comfort food of sorts for me. I had the preparation down to an art. Pop it in the microwave, punch in the time, spin on my heel and get a plate, knife, fork, and drink just in time for the delicious meal to be ready. Beyond those first initial preparations, I didn’t even glance at the package to read the directions. I knew this—this was my meal. Imagine my surprise when, after a hiatus of about a year, I fell back into my old routine to prepare this meal, and it was not cooked properly! You would think this would have prompted me to check the package, but no. I continued to prepare this food the old way, despite the quality suffering, for a few months. When I did finally check the package instructions, I realized they had changed. I learned firsthand how important it is to read and follow all cooking instructions on the package every single time and to fully cook convenience foods to prevent foodborne illnesses.
 

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By: Katie Burns Date: 9/2/11

Yesterday I had the honor of joining Dr. Robert Gravani, food science professor at Cornell University, and Ms. Diane Van, Food Safety Education Staff Deputy Director at FSIS, on a webcast “Cook it Safe: Practical Strategies for Reducing the Risk of Foodborne Illness.” For those of you who were unable to participate in the webcast, let me share with you some of the highlights:

 

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