Kris Sollid's blog

What is Sucralose?

Curious about low-calorie sweeteners? You’re not alone. Conflicting information about low-calorie sweeteners seems to be reaching new heights, so we’ve searched high and low for the facts. Here’s the low-down on sucralose.

Low- and no-calorie sweeteners like sucralose are a tool to help reduce the calories we consume from sugar. Sucralose is actually made from sugar, but it isn’t digested like it. In fact, most of the sucralose we consume isn’t absorbed by our bodies at all.

What’s Up with Protein and Protein Supps?

Chatter about protein and protein supplements have been getting a good deal of attention recently. With so much misinformation about amounts, timing and sources here are the answers to five common questions about this important macronutrient.

What is Stevia Leaf Extract

Curious about low-calorie sweeteners?  You’re not alone.  Conflicting information about low-calorie sweeteners seems to be reaching new heights, so we’ve searched high and low for the facts. Here’s the low-down on stevia sweeteners.

What is Aspartame?

Curious about low-calorie sweeteners?  You’re not alone.  Conflicting information about low-calorie sweeteners seems to be reaching new heights, so we’ve searched high and low for the facts. Here’s the low-down on aspartame.

What sets aspartame apart from other low-calorie sweeteners is its parts.  Aspartame is made of two amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine. When consumed, aspartame is broken down into these two amino acids and a small amount of methanol, all of which are also found naturally in fruits, vegetables, meat and eggs.

What is Acesulfame Potassium (Ace-K)?

Curious about low-calorie sweeteners?  You’re not alone.  Conflicting information about low-calorie sweeteners seems to be reaching new heights, so we’ve searched high and low for the facts. Here’s the low-down on acesulfame potassium, also known as “Ace-K.”

Ace-K provides no calories, has been FDA-approved since 1988, and is the primary sweetener found in brand names like Sunett® and Sweet One®.

Fast Take: Low-Calorie Sweetener Low Down on a Recent Review

If your curiosity about low-calorie sweeteners (LCS) is growing, you’re not alone. We get a lot of questions about them: “Will they help me lose weight? Are they safe? Should I avoid them?”, to cite a few. Researchers have sought to answer such questions through decades of scientific research. For those that follow the field, it seems as though a new study is published every week.

FAST TAKE: Is your fruit juice glass half-empty or half-full?

In case you weren’t paying attention, some juicy news circulated recently. Courtesy of the American Association of Pediatrics (AAP), there are new recommendations on fruit juice consumption for infants, toddlers and adolescents.

Juice has historically been a part of almost every child’s diet. But at what age should it be introduced? That’s the main question the AAP answered in their latest report.

Déjà Vu All Over Again: EFSA Says Sucralose is Safe

The late great Yogi Berra had a way with words. My personal favorite Yogism, “It’s deja vu all over again,” never made more sense than today. Once again, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has issued an opinion on the safety of sucralose. News flash (insert sarcastic pause), it’s still safe.

The Telephone Game, Sugars Edition

Nutrition conversations can be "qwerty" ... I mean, quirky. They’re eerily reminiscent of a favorite game from my youth—the telephone game. Remember it? It was always full of laughs, but it was also eventually full of falsehoods. It taught me valuable lessons about how easily facts can get distorted as information is shared.

Americans Are Consuming More Low-Calorie Sweeteners. Is This a Bad Thing?

"More." It’s an interesting word. Generally speaking, it has a great connotation. More money? Yes, please. More time? That sounds terrific, thank you. When it comes to food issues, however, more doesn’t always seem better.

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