Megan Meyer's blog

Passing on Tom Brady’s Diet

September means several things to me- the start of my favorite season (fall), my birthday (hooray!) and the beginning of football season. I grew up watching college football with my family on the weekends and going to some home games of our favorite teams. You could say that I am a pretty big football fan. But do you know what I am not a fan of? Professional athletes sharing diet and nutrition advice to the general public.

Newsbite: Is it necessary to avoid all processed foods?

There are so many misperceptions circulating about the science and technology behind making food more abundant, nutritious and safe. Because of this, the IFIC Foundation’s team of self-proclaimed food nerds, including RDs and PhDs, has launched a new digital creative campaign centered on sharing the science around our modern food system and around a variety of common processed foods.

Fast Take: Stop Pitting Macronutrients Against Each Other

Low-fat, high-carb: new data from the PURE cohort study

Why I Constantly Said “What the..?” While Watching What the Health

I am a big fan of documentaries- they are usually a good mix of entertainment and education (#nerdalert). But the latest documentary I watched, What the Health, missed the mark on both fronts for me. The film focused on promoting a vegan, plant-based lifestyle while denigrating all animal products including meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy. Now don’t get me wrong, most of us could benefit from eating more fruits and vegetables, but I do not think following a vegan diet is the only route to optimal health.  

Fast Take: Debunking Another Cheesy Report

Mac and cheese: a childhood favorite for many and a go-to comfort food. Unfortunately, this classic dish is under attack because of a common packaging compound. A new report found the presence of phthalates, commonly used in food packaging, in macaroni and cheese. Cue for fear-mongering media headlines.

What I Learned at the 2017 Experimental Biology Conference

At the end of April, I had the opportunity to attend, co-chair a session, and present at this year’s Experimental Biology (EB). Last year, I wrote about the top three things I learned from EB and thought it would be a good series to continue moving forward. This conference is a wonderful opportunity to learn about the latest research and attend sessions from leaders in nutrition and food science research as well as network with this engaged community.

Newsbite: Can Science Survive Without Reproducing?

It’s pretty easy to find an article touting the latest one-off study saying “X food will cure cancer” and then find another article saying “X food will cause cancer.” While reporting these findings is extremely important, often, the evidence from totality of science is overlooked, and conclusions from one-off studies are given much more attention. Even worse, follow-up research related to such studies are rarely covered in the media leaving misleading one-off studies unchallenged.

Peer Review: Referees Without Whistles

If you’re a sports fan like me, then you were glued to the couch watching the Final Four and National Championship game this past week. March Madness is one of the greatest spectacles in sport. It rarely disappoints, and this year was no different. Congrats to the Tarheels, by the way!

Sound Science: Two More Reasons to Eat Wholesome Whole Grains

We’re rounding out National Nutrition Month, with a new Sound Science analysis. In fact, this Sound Science piece includes a double feature. Recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, a pair of studies focused on a variety of health benefits associated with whole grain consumption, specific to the body weight and microbiome. Whether you are a carb enthusiast, carb skeptic, or somewhere in the middle, it’s important to take note new scientific findings and see how they align, enhance, or refute the current body of evidence.

Heart-y Snack Attack

In honor of American Heart Month and National Snack Foods Month, I thought it would be a great opportunity to talk about some of the best snack foods that also support heart health. So get ready to snack your heart out!

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