Webinar: What are the Influencers that Impact How & Why People Eat?

What are the Influencers that Impact How & Why People Eat? New Research Insights

Presented by Marla Reicks, PhD, RD and Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA

Date: November 18, 2014
Time: 11 am – 12 noon (CST)
CPEUs: 1.0
Cost: WM DPG Members, Free; Non-WM DPG Members $35

Sponsored by the International Food Information Council

The US diet is viewed as one that contains traditional meal patterns. However, new research is showing evidence of additional triggers to consider. Situation or emotion and demographics may affect eating patterns and dietary intake. By exploring realities of eating and drinking behaviors of specific populations and identifying the triggers that guide their food choices and lifestyle behavior, experts may be able to develop dietary guidance that is informed, actionable, and achievable.

Americans between eighteen and eighty years of age (balanced to be consistent with census data representative of the US population) completed a twenty-three-minute, English only, online survey. Sample size included 2,856 respondents, which included 8,135 eating and drinking occasions during March 10th-April 14th, 2013.

Results published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition indicate approximately half of consumption occasions are habitually driven, and one third cease when food is gone. Consumers who report having a healthful diet are more likely to rely on habit/time of day and seek out healthful foods, whereas those with the least healthful diet are more likely to eat simply because food is there and stop when it is gone. Therefore, dietary guidance should encourage consumers to recognize personal triggers and provide practical recommendations to respond with healthful action, especially for those who are prone to eating because food is available and until it is gone.

Objectives

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how frequency and characteristics of traditional meal and non-meal occasions vary by age, gender, presence of children, and body mass index (BMI).
  • Consider how these differences could be addressed when tailoring promotion of healthful intake at specific eating occasions for particular subgroups.
  • Design effective strategies to effectively communicate dietary change based on known challenges and patterns of eating behavior related to associated demographic variables.

Presenters

What are the Influencers that Impact How & Why People Eat?  New Research Insights

Presented by Marla Reicks, PhD, RD and Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA

Date: November 18, 2014
Time: 11 am – 12 noon (CST)
CPEUs: 1.0
Cost: WM DPG Members, Free; Non-WM DPG Members $35

Sponsored by the International Food Information Council

The US diet is viewed as one that contains traditional meal patterns. However, new research is showing evidence of additional triggers to consider. Situation or emotion and demographics may affect eating patterns and dietary intake. By exploring realities of eating and drinking behaviors of specific populations and identifying the triggers that guide their food choices and lifestyle behavior, experts may be able to develop dietary guidance that is informed, actionable, and achievable.

Americans between eighteen and eighty years of age (balanced to be consistent with census data representative of the US population) completed a twenty-three-minute, English only, online survey. Sample size included 2,856 respondents, which included 8,135 eating and drinking occasions during March 10th-April 14th, 2013.

Results published in the August 2014 issue of the Journal of the American College of Nutrition indicate approximately half of consumption occasions are habitually driven, and one third cease when food is gone. Consumers who report having a healthful diet are more likely to rely on habit/time of day and seek out healthful foods, whereas those with the least healthful diet are more likely to eat simply because food is there and stop when it is gone. Therefore, dietary guidance should encourage consumers to recognize personal triggers and provide practical recommendations to respond with healthful action, especially for those who are prone to eating because food is available and until it is gone.

Objectives

After this webinar, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how frequency and characteristics of traditional meal and non-meal occasions vary by age, gender, presence of children, and body mass index (BMI).
  • Consider how these differences could be addressed when tailoring promotion of healthful intake at specific eating occasions for particular subgroups.
  • Design effective strategies to effectively communicate dietary change based on known challenges and patterns of eating behavior related to associated demographic variables.

Presenters

Marla Reicks, Ph.D., RD

Professor & Extension Nutritionist; Director of Graduate Studies, Nutrition Education, University of Minnesota Department of Food Science and Nutrition

Marla has been a professor and Extension Nutritionist in the Department of Food Science and Nutrition at the University of Minnesota since 1990. She is currently Director of Graduate Studies in Nutrition. Her research and programming interests include dietary behavior change to improve intake of fruits, vegetables, calcium-rich and whole grain foods for school children and low-income families, and behavioral interventions to prevent weight gain. She has published widely in peer-reviewed journals in these areas and advised 45 graduate students to completion. Dr. Reicks received her Ph.D. in Nutrition from Iowa State University, Ames, IA in 1985 and has been a registered dietitian for 38 years. She is a member of the American Society for Nutrition, Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior, and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. She has served or currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior and Appetite.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marianne Smith Edge, MS, RD, LD, FADA

Senior Vice President, Nutrition and Food Safety, International Food Information Council Foundation

Marianne is Senior Vice President, Nutrition & Food Safety for the International  Food Information Council (IFIC) in Washington, DC, a nonprofit organization that effectively communicates sound,  science-based information on nutrition and food safety to health professionals, educators, government officials, journalists and consumers.

In her role at IFIC, Smith Edge is responsible for directing the overall nutrition and food safety strategic initiatives of the organization, group facilitation and external collaborations. She also serves as IFIC’s spokesperson on various nutrition, food safety and health issues.

Smith Edge is an experienced communicator, strategic planner, and facilitator with over 25 years of experience. Prior to joining IFIC, she was the owner of MSE and Associates, LLC providing strategic nutrition consulting services for the food and healthcare industry, as well as commodity groups.

Smith Edge was the 2003-04 president of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and received the ADA Medallion Award in 2009. Smith Edge is also a member of the Institute for Food Technologists (IFT) and the American Public Health Association. She recently completed her second term on the USDA National Research, Extension, Education, & Economics Advisory Board, the advisory board to the Secretary of Agriculture.  Smith Edge holds a Bachelor of Science degree in dietetics from the University of Kentucky where she was a member of the Board of Trustees (2000‐06) and a master’s degree in public health nutrition from Western Kentucky University. In August 2009, she earned a certification in Appreciative Inquiry from the Weatherhead School of Management, Case Western Reserve University.